CX Simplification Starts with Data

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Customer Engagement
Customer Experience
In a world where consumers are being bombarded with thousands of marketing messages each year, it's easy for consumers to fall victim to information overload and for marketers to confuse the decision-making process for consumers.

In a world where consumers are being bombarded with thousands of marketing messages each year, it's easy for consumers to fall victim to information overload and for marketers to confuse the decision-making process for consumers.

Instead, marketers must simply consumers' decision-making processes by offering less choices and making the path to purchase frictionless. The sheer proliferation of new online devices and digital channels is pushing leading-edge companies to rethink how they connect with and engage their customers. Their journeys cross myriad channels, devices, and also travels through marketing, sales, and service. Not only is this new "funnel" dizzying for consumers, it's confounding marketers who are rewriting the rules on how to meet the demands of customer engagement.

In today's feature article, "Mastering the Art of Simplified Experience," Judith Aquino discusses the value of elegant design and simplified customer experiences. In the feature, companies like Alton Lane and Turntable Kitchen exemplify the importance of simplifying interactions with their customers while staying authentic. Much of what drives their simplification is data. Alton Lane CEO and cofounder Colin Hunter said, "To drive simplicity of the consumer experience, we have to go through the complexity of capturing data, analyzing it, and streamlining processes."

Peppers & Rogers Group Co-founder Don Peppers says that an excellent customer experience is simply a frictionless one. One of his attributes to achieving a frictionless experience is "being relevant." "Customer incompetence is friction," he says. The most efficient way to overcome it is to remember each customer's individual specifications and needs, once you learn them."

That, however, can only be achieved when organizations actively collect and act on their customer data. I recently attended a marketing conference where many of the marketers I spoke to mentioned the current state of their data as being overwhelming. Many voiced confusion on where to even begin in terms of what data to they should start collecting.

Tomorrow I'll be attending Integrated Marketing Week. I hope to find some new examples of companies that are effectively putting their data to work in an effort to simplify their customer experiences, and I hope to share them with you in this blog in the coming weeks.

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION