Measuring Net Promoter Score Across Party Lines

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One of the most intriguing aspects of the U.S. presidential election is that there are so many different ways to spin the numbers on voter sentiment and voting blocs. How will Mitt Romney and President Obama fare with voters from military families and veterans or union workers? In a unique twist, the customer experience experts at Temkin Group have placed the presidential race under a different lens - how likely are consumers to recommend the candidates to their friends and colleagues?

One of the most intriguing aspects of the U.S. presidential election is that there are so many different ways to spin the numbers on voter sentiment and voting blocs. How will Mitt Romney and President Obama fare with voters from military families and veterans or union workers? In a unique twist, the customer experience experts at Temkin Group have placed the presidential race under a different lens - how likely are consumers to recommend the candidates to their friends and colleagues?Last week, Temkin Group released research which finds that President Obama has a higher number of promoters than Mitt Romney. In August, Temkin Group surveyed 5,000 U.S. consumers on their attitudes about both President Obama and Mitt Romney. The research reveals that both candidates have pretty lousy Net Promoter Scores (NPS) - 67 percent for Romney and 33 percent for President Obama. In fact, both candidates have more than twice as many detractors (consumers that are not likely to recommend them) as promoters (consumers that are very likely to recommend them).

Temkin Group's research also examined NPS across consumer segments. For instance:

- President Obama has greater support from all age groups 64 and younger while Romney has greater backing from voters 65 and older.
- President Obama has a larger lead with females than with males.
- Both candidates have roughly the same amount of support from Caucasians, but President Obama is enjoying a more than two-to-one advantage among Asian, African-American, and Hispanic voters.
- The gap with African-American voters is sizeable. With this group, President Obama has an NPS of +39 percent while Romney has -87 percent.

It will be interesting to see the results of the exit polls and whether these match up with the NPS findings. In the meantime, the two candidates and their campaigns will continue to curry votes with key voting blocs and demographic groups in battleground states.

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