CX Day: Fostering a Top-Down, Bottom-Up Approach to Customer Experience

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Customer Experience
As we celebrate CX Day to recognize the companies and people that create great experiences for their customers, it's a great opportunity to remember why senior management's commitment to customer experience is so critical. As Peppers & Rogers Group founding partners Don Peppers and Martha Rogers, Ph.D. have often noted, customers are a company's sole revenue source. Not its products. Not its services. By understanding and delivering on customers' needs and preferences, companies can deliver the types of experiences that can help keep customers loyal and attract new customers.

As we celebrate CX Day to recognize the companies and people that create great experiences for their customers, it's a great opportunity to remember why senior management's commitment to customer experience is so critical. As Peppers & Rogers Group founding partners Don Peppers and Martha Rogers, Ph.D. have often noted, customers are a company's sole revenue source. Not its products. Not its services. By understanding and delivering on customers' needs and preferences, companies can deliver the types of experiences that can help keep customers loyal and attract new customers. A commitment to delivering great customer experiences has to start from the top of the organization if employees are to be expected to carry these practices out in their day-to-day roles.

The CEO should regularly talk about customer experience to employees and clearly communicate why customer experience is important for the company's short-term and long-term goals. If employees aren't hearing senior management consistently talk about the importance of customer experience, then from an employee's perspective it doesn't appear to be a priority for the company.

Employees also want evidence that executive commitment to customer experience isn't just lip service. For instance, in addition to consistent communications about customer experience, does the organization monitor, measure, and take steps to improve the customer experience? Is the company continually investing to improve the customer experience? If there's no funding, there's no commitment. Is the compensation of the executive team based, in part, on the execution of customer experience goals?

If employees are able to see past any bluster regarding executive commitment to customer experience, they're not going to buy into the importance of customer experience.

However, when senior management demonstrates a genuine commitment to customer experience and these practices are consistently communicated and carried out over time, this sends a strong message to the rank-and-file that customer experience is something that everyone needs to pay attention to.

Moreover, an executive team that's committed to customer experience will also communicate the importance of having engaged employees and will take the steps needed to strengthen employee engagement. It's doesn't mean much for a CEO to talk about how employees are a company's most important asset if the company does little to keep them happy and motivated.

Companies that have a clear mission to deliver consistent customer experiences have buy-in from across the enterprise.

This post is part of the Customer Experience Professionals Association's Blog Carnival "Celebrating Customer Experience." It is part of a broader celebration of Customer Experience Day. Check out posts from other bloggers here. - See more at: http://cxday.org

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