Analysts Are Essential in Creating a Holistic Customer Picture

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Data Analytics
Customer Experience
As organizations strive to bridge their data silos to create a holistic customer view, the need for great analysts to read and analyze the information will increase. However, there's concern about a lack of analysts to fill the increasing number of positions needed to make sense out of aggregated data, ensuring this information is applied in the best ways possible to improve the customer experience.

Companies want to bridge their information silos to have a holistic customer view, knowing that this will allow them to give their clients a better and more personalized service. While many experts argue that silos are actually necessary to ensure that different departments strive for accountability, focus, and specialization, the ultimate aim for organizations is to have a complete picture of their customers and ensure seamless service across different channels and departments. This objective is pushing companies to invest in bridging silos. But bringing data together is only the start of the process--the next step is applying the necessary analytic wisdom to make the most out of the information that every organization has.

According to Jodie Monger, Ph.D., president of Customer Relationship Metrics, organizations need to invest in analysts to make sense out of the mountains of information. "Software doesn't give all the answers," she says. "We need analysts that are able to understand and interpret this data."

However, some organizations are finding it difficult to find the analytics resources to make the most of the data. Monger says she's concerned that there aren't enough analysts to fill the increasing number of positions needed to make sense out of aggregated data, ensuring that data is applied in the best ways possible to improve the customer experience. She says investing in sophisticated software is not going to solve the problem of making the most out of information. "It's like building a mega jet but not having the pilots to fly it," Monger says.

Monger says this skills gap is of concern and believes that more needs to be done to give children the necessary analytic background that will get them interested in such a career path. She argues that in order to become good analysts, children need to be exposed to analytical thinking from an early age, allowing them to be creative and think laterally.

As solutions become more sophisticated and organizations try to do more with the data they have, the need for great analysts will only increase. "We're creating a perfect storm," Monger says. "As things become more complicated and advanced, we won't have the staff to do what we want to do."

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION