Employee Engagement Insights to Inspire

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Employee Engagement Strategies
Employee Engagement
As more employees take on multiple responsibilities with little to no pay increases and no growth paths in place, it therefore should be no surprise that employee engagement is at an all-time low.

As more employees take on multiple responsibilities with little to no pay increases and no growth paths in place, it therefore should be no surprise that employee engagement is at an all-time low.

A global study released yesterday by the Hay Group division of Korn Ferry (KFY), an organizational advisory firm, shows that there is a critical need to improve employee engagement.

The survey, which includes data from more than 7,500 business and HR leaders in 107 countries, found that across all leadership levels, an average of only 36 percent of employees are "highly engaged."

As Judith Aquino pointed out in this week's 1to1 Media feature, "A Recipe for Building a Team from Scratch," every business understands the value of high-performing employees. But with so much attention paid to optimizing the performance of employees individually, it can be easy to overlook the vital importance of great teamwork. And in today's fast-paced economy, where businesses are becoming increasingly cross-functional and innovative thinking is highly valued, collaboration is critical.

I've included links to the best employee engagement blog posts this week to help shed some light on how to correct this mounting organizational issue.

In Harvard Business Reviews, "Big Companies Don't have to Be Soulless Places to Work," by Ron Carucci, Carucci maintains that big companies have to take the most chronic complaints about them and flip them on their heads, making radical changes that will dramatically improve how they are experienced by their employees. He says to promote the truth, design creative jobs, and focus people on a few common goals.

In "Effective Feedback on Employee Performance," Flavio Martins maintains that one of the fundamental principles of creating effective employees and to create an outstanding team in your organization is providing effective feedback on the performance of your team members. He discusses the four key steps on which customer feedback should center.

In "An Open Letter to Restoration Hardware CEO Gary Friedman," Jeanne Bliss offers a nine-step action plan for inspiring customer-focused growth in employees.

In "What's the Best Way to Recognize Employees," Bruce Jones, senior programming director, Disney Institute, asked Disney Institute's social media followers how they prefer to be recognized at work. The blog includes their responses.

And in "Changing the Way we Change," Lior Arussy discusses how the clash between human resistance to change and the scope and speed of change today is inevitable and calls for a new review of the way organizations approach change. He offers three ways organizations should approach change.

Employee engagement shouldn't be described as a one-time training module or annual recognition program; it should be elevated within organizations as an ongoing strategy with dedicated resources and long-term goals. Hopefully these posts will inspire some ideas to implement in your organization.

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION