Employee Engagement Is on the Rise

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Employee Engagement Strategies
Employee Engagement
The U.S. has long been experiencing an employee engagement crisis. That's changing, according to Gallup. Gallup's tracking in March showed an upturn, indicating that companies may be breaking through engagement barriers that have caused stagnant numbers in recent years. March's numbers showed that the percentage of U.S. workers whom Gallup considers "engaged" in their jobs averaged 34.1 percent in March, the highest level since Gallup began tracking U.S. workplace engagement daily in January 2011.

The U.S. has long been experiencing an employee engagement crisis. That's changing, according to Gallup.

Gallup's tracking in March showed an upturn, indicating that companies may be breaking through engagement barriers that have caused stagnant numbers in recent years. March's numbers showed that the percentage of U.S. workers whom Gallup considers "engaged" in their jobs averaged 34.1 percent in March, the highest level since Gallup began tracking U.S. workplace engagement daily in January 2011.

A number of influencers have been writing about the benefits of engaged employees.

In "The Biggest Mistake Made in Employee Engagement," Marshall Goldsmith, maintains that focusing on how companies can increase employee engagement and completely ignoring how the employees could increase their own engagement is the biggest mistake brands make in employee engagement efforts.

"It's true that creating a great environment is a key factor in building engagement, and we all have the opportunity to take responsibility for our own lives and to do our best to build our own engagement, regardless of what the company is doing," Goldsmith said.

Adrian Swinscoe, in "When It Comes To Employee Engagement, What's Your Keystone?," said, the figures in Gallup's research haven't changed much in 15 years. "Does it mean that many efforts to engage employees are just not working and there is a bigger issue at play here?" Swinscoe asked. "Or, is it that there is just too much 'off the shelf' thinking going on and that many of the employee engagement efforts that are taking place are doing nothing more than paying 'lip-service' to the issue? I would argue that it is the latter that is closer to the truth. "

And in "The Secret to Being Happy at Work," Colin Shaw, CEO of BeyondPhilsophy, said many employees think if they get a promotion or achieve a sales goal, they'll be happy at work. But that doesn't always work. "The key to being happy at work is to learn to look for the positive (and appreciate it), to resist the impulse to blame or complain, and to recognize the wins when they happen instead of deferring your celebration until you win bigger at a later date. The secret to happiness is to learn that there is no secret at all. Just a willingness to look at things a different way and see the roses instead of the thorns," he said.

How are you achieving employee satisfaction and engagement at your company?

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION