Feds Sharpen Focus on Using Customer Experience Metrics

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Metrics & Measurement
Customer Experience
Companies in the private sector continue to adopt customer experience metrics such as customer effort score and Net Promoter Score to get a better handle on how satisfied customers are and to help determine whether customer experience investments are paying off. As government agencies become more citizen-centric, the public sector is also beginning to apply greater focus to applying customer experience measurements.

Companies in the private sector continue to adopt customer experience metrics such as customer effort score and Net Promoter Score to get a better handle on how satisfied customers are and to help determine whether customer experience investments are paying off. As government agencies become more citizen-centric, the public sector is also beginning to apply greater focus to applying customer experience measurements.The General Services Administration (GSA) recently began testing a new customer experience index to collect feedback on the agency's digital tools. Late last year, GSA's Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies (OCSIT) used the Government Customer Experience Index to survey nearly 9,000 federal employees from 135 different agencies on satisfaction with various digital tools that are available. This includes employee feedback on some of GSA's technical initiatives, such as the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program or FedRAMP security assessment and monitoring for cloud products and services.

GSA has also recently galvanized a community of federal agency officials to drive further improvements to the services that are offered to citizens. Led by OSCIT, the so-called Customer Experience Community Practice gathers government officials to explore ways to improve the delivery of federal services by on the needs of citizens.

Moving forward, OSCIT plans to share the feedback from the index with its staff to evaluate the responses and then follow up on the findings.

It's great to see government agencies taking steps to gain a deeper understanding of the preferences and needs of citizens across different demographics. Improvements are still needed. According to a report from the Government Business Council, public satisfaction with federal customer service is at an eight-year low.

Tracking the steps that citizens take in their efforts to apply for a passport or to make a tax payment can help government officials to identify any barriers that are in place that make it difficult for citizens to accomplish their goals. A citizen-centric government not only improves citizen satisfaction, it saves government agencies (and taxpayers) money by developing more efficient processes and systems.

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION