Three Ways That Customer Experience Measurement Will Change Going Forward

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Metrics & Measurement
Customer Experience
There are multiple ways that organizational leaders measure customer experience, including first contact resolution (FCR), customer satisfaction, Net Promoter Score (NPS), Customer Effort Score (CES) to name a few. In observation of CX Day, a date that's celebrated by the CXPA to recognize great customer experiences and the professionals who make them possible, I thought I'd share a few observations - and predictions - as to how customer experience measurements will change in coming years and the factors behind these changes.

There are multiple ways that organizational leaders measure customer experience, including first contact resolution (FCR), customer satisfaction, Net Promoter Score (NPS), Customer Effort Score (CES) to name a few. In observation of CX Day (#CXDay), a date that's celebrated by the CXPA to recognize great customer experiences and the professionals who make them possible, I thought I'd share a few observations - and predictions - as to how customer experience measurements will change in coming years and the factors behind these changes.Here are three ways that customer experience measurement will change in the years to come:

1. A comprehensive omnichannel CX metric. As companies become more proficient at handling customer interactions across a variety of physical and digital channels and as decision-makers become more adept at monitoring and understanding the drivers behind customers' digital experiences, the measurements used to track the omnichannel customer experience will also continue to evolve. At some point, it's not unreasonable to expect that there will be a metric that's used to roll up a customer's omnichannel customer experiences into an aggregate score that can be weighted based on the experiences that matter most to customers.

For instance, let's say a chat support experience which resolves a smartphone issue ranks high in importance for a particular wireless customer. By comparison, a recent in-store experience with the wireless provider may have been deemed informational for the customer but ranks lower in their overall hierarchy of needs. As companies become more skilled at capturing the sentiment shared by customers in their experiences and are better able to decipher which attributes matter most to customers, a yardstick that's used to capture, analyze, and act on the omnichannel customer experience would be incredibly useful.

2. A granular gauge of social customer influence. As customers have become more mobile and social, they've also become extraordinarily vocal. As a McKinsey & Company study reveals, word of mouth is the primary factor behind 20 to 50 percent of all purchasing decisions. Still, despite the emergence of social influence scoring services such as Klout, Kred, and PeerIndex, business leaders continue to struggle to effectively correlate influence with action.

As marketers and other business leaders strive for more effective ways to measure social influence and the bearing this has on purchase decisions, loyalty, and other aspects of customer experience, additional metrics will likely be conceived that attempt to measure not only an individual person's social influence on others but also the impact of self-organizing communities which rally around a common interest. This may include a closer look at the degree to which sentiment ultimately influenced another person's purchasing decision, decision to change brands, or another action (say on a scale of 1 to 10 where sentiment may have played a moderate role ["6"] in shaping a person's actions but that additional research and other input led to the person's ultimate decision. It's hard to say whether customer experience measurements will become this granular, but as companies become more adept at gathering and analyzing specific data sets, it's not out of the realm of possibilities.

3. Assessing the degree of friction. As Peppers & Rogers Group founding partner Don Peppers points out, the best possible customer experience is frictionless. Indeed, it's a noble pursuit, but how are you able to measure or quantify the amount of friction in a customer's experience? As companies continue to ramp up their focus on delivering frictionless experiences (whether by phone, in-store, mobile, etc.), greater attention will be paid to the customer journey and the elements that are required to deliver a frictionless experience.

This post is part of the Customer Experience Professionals Association's Blog Carnival "Celebrating Customer Experience." It is part of a broader celebration of Customer Experience Day. Check out posts from other bloggers here. See more here.

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