Do Your Customers Love You?

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Personalization
Marketing
On ABC's The Bachelor, the man of the hour typically splits his time between one-on-one dates and group dates. Each eligible lady eagerly anticipates the prospect of the one-on-one, as they logically prefer the intimacy of one day alone over sharing their potential love interest's attention. Such dates allow the "couple" to build and strengthen their budding relationship, while group dates pander to the insecurities of every woman in the group.

On ABC's The Bachelor, the man of the hour typically splits his time between one-on-one dates and group dates. Each eligible lady eagerly anticipates the prospect of the one-on-one, as they logically prefer the intimacy of one day alone over sharing their potential love interest's attention. Such dates allow the "couple" to build and strengthen their budding relationship, while group dates pander to the insecurities of every woman in the group.Yet, while this outrageous reality show attracts ire and ridicule from all angles, the scenes on screen may offer marketers an interesting lesson in personalization and customer care. Just think--individualized messages are the personal one-on-one dates of the marketing world, while mass messages are the group dates everyone dreads. Every customer wants to feel special, worthwhile, and valued with each brand encounter, but irrelevant offers can often lead to a breakdown in communication and trust.

As Responsys highlights with its recent survey, marketing campaigns and promotions have the power to make or break customer relationships. The study, which polled 2,035 U.S. online adults, explores what factors encourage loyalty, and which actions trigger attrition. The following statistics explore precisely how consumers perceive their current relationships and the problems that may send them packing:

- Seventy-three percent of consumers want to have a long-term relationship with brands that reward them for being a loyal customer.

- Thirty-two percent of U.S. adults say the brands they love only send offers and promotions in which they are interested.

- Of the 34 percent that say they have "broken up" with a brand due to poor, disruptive, or irrelevant marketing messages, 53 percent have done so because the brand continuously sent irrelevant content on multiple channels.

- While 42 percent "broke up" with a brand because they never signed up to receive offers and marketing messages in the first place, 33 percent say the "break up" resulted from generic, impersonal messaging that was clearly not targeted to the individual.

- Fifty-nine percent of those surveyed say they sometimes choose one competitive brand over another simply because of the offer or marketing materials received.

But how do you know if your customers truly love your brand or not? Consider the infographic below and post your findings in the comments below! We'd love to know if your customers will "accept the rose" they've been handed, and how you plan to reengage those who may be more inclined to head home.

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION