Cracking Down on Contact Center Complaints

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Voice of the Customer
Customer Service
Before the latest technologies introduced the joys of self-service, the contact center was our only true method for troubleshooting and issue resolution. Notorious for its lengthy wait times and frustrating interactions, calling the customer service hotline remains a last resort for most, even to this day, for most appear ill-equipped for the connected, impatient consumer of today.

Before the latest technologies introduced the joys of self-service, the contact center was our only true method for troubleshooting and issue resolution. Notorious for its lengthy wait times and frustrating interactions, calling the customer service hotline remains a last resort for most, even to this day, for most appear ill-equipped for the connected, impatient consumer of today."Anyone who has ever spent an hour on the phone with customer service will repeat that story for years to come," says Matthew Lautz, president of CorvisaCloud. "These days, it takes even less time spent on hold for callers to retell their negative experience. Mobile and chat options have increased accessibility and diminished patience for long wait times and unhelpful encounters."

Though today's tools and solutions continue to advance, the average contact center still lags behind, eliciting anger and dissatisfaction more often than happiness and approval. And, according to CorvisaCloud's recent study, these customers aren't afraid to express their feelings, either:

* When it comes to the most aggravating experience encountered when speaking to customer service agents, the greatest annoyance was having to repeat the same information multiple time on a call (20 percent), followed by wait time prior to being helped (16 percent), speaking to an unknowledgeable person (15 percent), and being transferred to multiple agents on one call (14 percent).

* Customers will likely complain or ask for a manager (34 percent), share their experience with friends and family (16 percent), or never shop with the company again (13 percent) after a negative experience.

* However, those who've had a positive customer service experience will likely provide feedback to the company (31 percent), continue to shop with the company, perhaps more frequently (29 percent), or just do nothing and smile to themselves (16 percent).

* Fifteen percent of respondents would prefer to go to the dentist instead of speaking with customer service, while 13 percent would rather shop in the crowds on Black Friday.

Companies across industries will agree that customer service can truly make or break current and potential customer relationships, which is why the customer must always come first. Customer experience has become the ultimate differentiator in an extremely competitive landscape, but in many instances, companies fail to provide top-notch service because they lack the blended capabilities necessary to ensure quick, efficient customer service across all touchpoints.

"As a contact center, your main objective should be providing responsive, high-quality service," adds Lautz. "A company whose customer service department is lagging behind can usually be directly correlated to one of two things: their contact center technology--or lack thereof--or lackluster management. And often, the two tie together with the subpar technology making it difficult for managers to be effective." Companies require solutions that work together to blend customer data into one singular profile, allowing information to flow between channels for a holistic view of the consumer. Only then will contact centers be able to offer the level of service customers have come to expect and appreciate.

EXPERT OPINION
EXPERT OPINION